This time I’m voting!

This time I’m voting!

  Launched by The European Parliament.

This time I’m voting is a peer-to-peer mobilisation campaign, which brings together a community of people, united by European values, that work together to convince others to vote in the European elections.

   Join 368 other Europeans supporting this cause.

   Why should You support this cause?

As Europeans, we face many challenges, from migration to climate change, from youth unemployment to data privacy. We live in an ever more globalised, competitive world. At the same time, the Brexit referendum has demonstrated that the EU is not an irrevocable project. And while most of us take democracy for granted, it also seems under increasing threat, both in principle and practice.

That’s why we have started building a community of supporters to help encourage a higher voter turnout at the European elections. Our goal is not to tell people who they should vote for: it is to promote the act of voting itself, the act of engaging in the democratic process; and the act of doing so in a conscious and fully informed way. We want to harness the power of human interaction and build a community of supporters across Europe to rally behind the cause of voting and to stand up for the very idea of democracy. Together decide what kind of Europe we want to live in.

Because this time it’s not enough to hope for a better future: this time each and every one of us must take responsibility for it too.

The platform where it all takes place is called .

  These organisations support this cause
  What are your thoughts on this Cause? Debate and discuss it!

This time I’m voting!

  Launched by The European Parliament.

This time I’m voting is a peer-to-peer mobilisation campaign, which brings together a community of people, united by European values, that work together to convince others to vote in the European elections.

   Join 368 other Europeans supporting this cause.

   Why should You support this cause?

As Europeans, we face many challenges, from migration to climate change, from youth unemployment to data privacy. We live in an ever more globalised, competitive world. At the same time, the Brexit referendum has demonstrated that the EU is not an irrevocable project. And while most of us take democracy for granted, it also seems under increasing threat, both in principle and practice.

That’s why we have started building a community of supporters to help encourage a higher voter turnout at the European elections. Our goal is not to tell people who they should vote for: it is to promote the act of voting itself, the act of engaging in the democratic process; and the act of doing so in a conscious and fully informed way. We want to harness the power of human interaction and build a community of supporters across Europe to rally behind the cause of voting and to stand up for the very idea of democracy. Together decide what kind of Europe we want to live in.

Because this time it’s not enough to hope for a better future: this time each and every one of us must take responsibility for it too.

The platform where it all takes place is called .

  These organisations support the cause
  What are your thoughts on this Cause? Debate and discuss it!

We need a European Citizens’ Assembly with randomized selection to reconnect us Citizens to the EU!

european citizens assembly

We need a European Citizens’ Assembly with randomized selection to reconnect us Citizens to the EU!

  Launched by Tobias Kopf.

Help to bring the Citizens’ Assembly on the agenda in order to create the first body that gives every European citizen the chance to be actively involved in the EU. The proposal is a forerunner in the formation of a common voice and European civil duty.

   Join some other 70 Europeans supporting this cause.

   Why should You support this cause?

Ask somebody what he or she thinks about the European Union today! Literally – go out there and ask a family member, a friend, or a colleague. Start a discussion and at least at one point you will hear something like “The EU acts undemocratically”, “What do these politicians in Brussels care about us”, or “I can neither understand nor impact what is going on there.” Probably, you have thought something comparable on your own at some point in the past.

But how can we bridge this perceived distance and mistrust? The American judicial system leads the way since years: Usual citizen like us get appointed as jurors to decide verdicts. Furthermore, Ireland has established a Citizens’ Assembly in which citizens deliberate about urgent issues and, finally, come up with recommendations for the Irish parliament. Both pioneer for a European institution that reconnects citizens with the EU.

Let’s draw this lesson and start a call for the European Citizens’ Assembly. The body consists of us – European citizens – who engage in a reasonable and substantive manner on the European level. Help to form the voice of us and support the following concrete claims:

1. The European Union establishes a Citizens’ Assembly which advises the European Parliament on certain issues.

The Irish Citizens’ Assembly serves as a model of a successful and deliberative body which consists of usual citizens. Over the last two years, the Assembly met 12 times and delivered meaningful recommendations about, for example, ageing population and constitutional issues. We want to install a comparable European Citizens’ Assembly that has a say not in technical regulations but questions of norms, culture, and living together.

2. A random selection process determines the members of the Assembly which is convened around 3-4 times a year in Brussels.

The Citizens’ Assembly comes together in about four days long meetings at Brussels. The members discuss and finalise recommendations on grounds of expert briefings. Depending on the issues on the agenda, the Assembly should meet at least 3-4 times a year in varying composition. A random selection ensures a chance for every European citizen to be appointed and that neither selection bias nor partisanship distorts the purpose of the body.

3. The empowerment of citizens introduces a European civil duty.

Ideas about citizenship or civic virtue are part of our European heritage. They have in common to claim more responsibility for the people in exchange for a civil duty. In that way, the Citizens’ Assembly empowers people to act as real European citizens and manifests a sense of European community.

Help to bring the Citizens’ Assembly on the agenda in order to create the first body that gives every European citizen the chance to be actively involved in the EU. The proposal is a forerunner in the formation of a common voice and European civil duty. It is up to you: Become a real European citizen and consolidate for a Citizens’ Assembly!

Not sure how supporting a Cause on Talos will have an impact?

Have a look at our quick guidelines to understand how we enable you to drive institutionalized change in Europe.

Whether you support a Cause or launch your own, Talos empowers you to be a more impactful citizen!

 This is where our supporters come from
  These organisations support this cause
  What are your thoughts on this Cause? Debate and discuss it!

We need a European Citizens’ Assembly with randomized selection to reconnect us Citizens to the EU!

  Launched by Tobias Kopf.

Help to bring the Citizens’ Assembly on the agenda in order to create the first body that gives every European citizen the chance to be actively involved in the EU. The proposal is a forerunner in the formation of a common voice and European civil duty.

   Join some other 70 Europeans supporting this cause.

   Why should You support this cause?

Ask somebody what he or she thinks about the European Union today! Literally – go out there and ask a family member, a friend, or a colleague. Start a discussion and at least at one point you will hear something like “The EU acts undemocratically”, “What do these politicians in Brussels care about us”, or “I can neither understand nor impact what is going on there.” Probably, you have thought something comparable on your own at some point in the past.

But how can we bridge this perceived distance and mistrust? The American judicial system leads the way since years: Usual citizen like us get appointed as jurors to decide verdicts. Furthermore, Ireland has established a Citizens’ Assembly in which citizens deliberate about urgent issues and, finally, come up with recommendations for the Irish parliament. Both pioneer for a European institution that reconnects citizens with the EU.

Let’s draw this lesson and start a call for the European Citizens’ Assembly. The body consists of us – European citizens – who engage in a reasonable and substantive manner on the European level. Help to form the voice of us and support the following concrete claims:

1. The European Union establishes a Citizens’ Assembly which advises the European Parliament on certain issues.

The Irish Citizens’ Assembly serves as a model of a successful and deliberative body which consists of usual citizens. Over the last two years, the Assembly met 12 times and delivered meaningful recommendations about, for example, ageing population and constitutional issues. We want to install a comparable European Citizens’ Assembly that has a say not in technical regulations but questions of norms, culture, and living together.

2. A random selection process determines the members of the Assembly which is convened around 3-4 times a year in Brussels.

The Citizens’ Assembly comes together in about four days long meetings at Brussels. The members discuss and finalise recommendations on grounds of expert briefings. Depending on the issues on the agenda, the Assembly should meet at least 3-4 times a year in varying composition. A random selection ensures a chance for every European citizen to be appointed and that neither selection bias nor partisanship distorts the purpose of the body.

3. The empowerment of citizens introduces a European civil duty.

Ideas about citizenship or civic virtue are part of our European heritage. They have in common to claim more responsibility for the people in exchange for a civil duty. In that way, the Citizens’ Assembly empowers people to act as real European citizens and manifests a sense of European community.

In order to ensure that our reform proposals are institutionally taken up, we are launching a European Parliament e-petition. To be successful, we need the support of each and every EU citizen who agrees with us. With your support, together we can make the system more responsive, incentivising and impactful, and thus open up more impactful opportunities to drive real change in our European Union. Let’s reform together the e-petition system of our European Parliament!

Not sure how supporting a cause on Talos will have an impact?

Have a look at our quick guidelines to understand how we enable to drive real change in Europe.

Whether you support a cause or launch your own, Talos offers you the chance to be a more impactful citizen!

 This is where our supporters come from
  These organisations support the cause
  What are your thoughts on this Cause? Debate and discuss it!

Let’s reform the e-petition system of our European Parliament!

Let’s reform the e-petition system of our European Parliament!

  Launched by Talos.

We seek a reform of the e-petition system of our European Parliament, so that EU Member State citizens may raise awareness of their concerns and request solutions in a more impactful way.

   Join some other 34 Europeans supporting this cause.

White papers Talos
   Why should You support this cause?

We, Europeans can be proud, as we are global pioneers in the field of e-democracy: e-petition systems are a Scottish invention. Since their adoption by the Scottish Parliament in 1999, parliamentary e-petition systems have been adopted by the German Bundestag, the UK House of Commons and our European Parliament.

Guaranteed as a fundamental right of EU Member State citizens through Article 227 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the European Parliament’s e-petition system allows us to raise awareness of our concerns and request solutions to our challenges that are of public or private interest. It allows us to directly make an impact on our deliberative democratic processes, and to engage in agenda-setting as citizens.

However, a lot has changed since its introduction, and as such the current system is outdated and in need of reform. Taking a positive approach, let us apply 21st century advancements in civic technology therefore, and constructively improve the e-petition system of our European Parliament! In order to ensure that EU Member State citizens may raise awareness of their concerns and request solutions in a more impactful way, we recommend three concrete reforms, building on best practice examples:

1. A response threshold should be introduced

In the UK House of Commons, a petition which reaches 10,000 signatures secures a response from the UK government. If 100,000 signatures are collected, the petition must be considered for a debate in the House of Commons. We recommend that the e-petition system of our European Parliament should contain two similar thresholds. First, a smaller one for a response from our European Commission to an e-petition. Secondly, a larger one for an e-petition to be considered for debate in the European Parliament.

2. Petitioners should be invited to European Parliament Committee and Plenary Hearings

In the Scottish Parliament, the proposer of an e-petition which secures a significant amount of support may be invited to appear before the Public Petitions Committee to speak in support of one’s e-petition, and to answer questions which Members of the Scottish Parliament might have. The same process occurs in the Committee on Petitions of our European Parliament. In order to better recognize and ensure greater exposure for civic initiatives, our European Parliament should also allow for the invitation of representatives of a popular e-petition to Committee and Plenary hearings in our European Parliament.

3. A debating forum on e-petitions should be created

In the German Bundestag, citizens may debate parliamentary e-petitions, submitted by fellow citizens. In order to ensure that e-petitions are discussed and debated in an open, transparent and public manner, we recommend that our European Parliament provide a debating feature on our e-petition platform. This would ensure that EU Member State citizens sign an e-petition following a civic discussion, which would allow for the merits and demerits of a proposal to be rationally considered before offering support, thus improving the quality of deliberative democracy throughout our European Union.

In order to ensure that our reform proposals are institutionally taken up, we are launching a European Parliament e-petition. To be successful, we need the support of each and every EU citizen who agrees with us. With your support, together we can make the system more responsive, incentivising and impactful, and thus open up more impactful opportunities to drive real change in our European Union. Let’s reform together the e-petition system of our European Parliament!

Not sure how supporting a Cause on Talos will have an impact?

Have a look at our quick guidelines to understand how we enable you to drive institutionalized change in Europe.

Whether you support a Cause or launch your own, Talos empowers you to be a more impactful citizen!

 This is where our supporters come from
  These organisations support this cause
  What are your thoughts on this Cause? Debate and discuss it!

Let’s reform the e-petition system of our European Parliament!

  Launched by Talos.

We seek a reform of the e-petition system of our European Parliament, so that EU Member State citizens may raise awareness of their concerns and request solutions in a more impactful way.

   Join some other 34 Europeans supporting this cause.

   Why should You support this cause?

We, Europeans can be proud, as we are global pioneers in the field of e-democracy: e-petition systems are a Scottish invention. Since their adoption by the Scottish Parliament in 1999, parliamentary e-petition systems have been adopted by the German Bundestag, the UK House of Commons and our European Parliament.

Guaranteed as a fundamental right of EU Member State citizens through Article 227 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the European Parliament’s e-petition system allows us to raise awareness of our concerns and request solutions to our challenges that are of public or private interest. It allows us to directly make an impact on our deliberative democratic processes, and to engage in agenda-setting as citizens.

However, a lot has changed since its introduction, and as such the current system is outdated and in need of reform. Taking a positive approach, let us apply 21st century advancements in civic technology therefore, and constructively improve the e-petition system of our European Parliament! In order to ensure that EU Member State citizens may raise awareness of their concerns and request solutions in a more impactful way, we recommend three concrete reforms, building on best practice examples:

1. A response threshold should be introduced

In the UK House of Commons, a petition which reaches 10,000 signatures secures a response from the UK government. If 100,000 signatures are collected, the petition must be considered for a debate in the House of Commons. We recommend that the e-petition system of our European Parliament should contain two similar thresholds. First, a smaller one for a response from our European Commission to an e-petition. Secondly, a larger one for an e-petition to be considered for debate in the European Parliament.

2. Petitioners should be invited to European Parliament Committee and Plenary Hearings

In the Scottish Parliament, the proposer of an e-petition which secures a significant amount of support may be invited to appear before the Public Petitions Committee to speak in support of one’s e-petition, and to answer questions which Members of the Scottish Parliament might have. The same process occurs in the Committee on Petitions of our European Parliament. In order to better recognize and ensure greater exposure for civic initiatives, our European Parliament should also allow for the invitation of representatives of a popular e-petition to Committee and Plenary hearings in our European Parliament.

3. A debating forum on e-petitions should be created

In the German Bundestag, citizens may debate parliamentary e-petitions, submitted by fellow citizens. In order to ensure that e-petitions are discussed and debated in an open, transparent and public manner, we recommend that our European Parliament provide a debating feature on our e-petition platform. This would ensure that EU Member State citizens sign an e-petition following a civic discussion, which would allow for the merits and demerits of a proposal to be rationally considered before offering support, thus improving the quality of deliberative democracy throughout our European Union.

In order to ensure that our reform proposals are institutionally taken up, we are launching a European Parliament e-petition. To be successful, we need the support of each and every EU citizen who agrees with us. With your support, together we can make the system more responsive, incentivising and impactful, and thus open up more impactful opportunities to drive real change in our European Union. Let’s reform together the e-petition system of our European Parliament!

Not sure how supporting a cause on Talos will have an impact?

Have a look at our quick guidelines to understand how we enable to drive real change in Europe.

Whether you support a cause or launch your own, Talos offers you the chance to be a more impactful citizen!

 This is where our supporters come from
  These organisations support the cause
  What are your thoughts on this Cause? Debate and discuss it!